Tulip Country

“You like what you see?” he said, pressing down toward his crotch as the others laughed, all five of them now cornering us. They were drunk. Scottish men in Kilts touring Amsterdam for a football match and who thought that they can celebrate the win by visiting the Red Light District at the same time my friend from Canberra had asked me to join her.

“I told you I didn’t want to come here,” I whispered, feeling the tension quake through my veins, mostly from anger. People often think my hands shake from fear, but it is far from that, shuddering from the pressure of controlling and suppressing my indignation knowing that it might get me into more trouble. Read More

Saolré: The Cycle of Life

As I prepare for my trip to beautiful, mythical Ireland in a few months, I am excited about visiting Newgrange (Gaelic sí an bhrú), which is a prehistoric 6,000 year old megalithic in County Meath. What is unique about this monument is that during the Winter Solstice, the sun rises over Boyne Valley and the beams of light strike into the passage chamber. It has been suggested that it was designed to observe solar and lunar cycles as well as that of Venus, but the attachment to astronomical and calendrical cycles with ancient mythological lore is clear, such as Aengus and Caer (I will be writing more about Irish myths and legends at a later date). What is more obvious is the understanding of the importance of cycles that exist in nature and our universe. Read More

My Doco: As It Happened – Ongoing Stories of the Nakba

I am very excited to permanently add my first documentary to my blog. At the moment, I am a semi-finalist for three international film festival awards – two in The Netherlands and one in Italy – and have won a monthly award for best world cinema documentary! It is nice to be recognised, however small and new to filmmaking I am, but it is more about helping me send the message of these youngsters to as many people as I can.

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The Canterbury Tales: Kaikoura to Hanmer Springs

“Shit!” the Kiwi yelped along with the echoes of awe by the others watching when I successfully shot the clay target with the shotgun. “Have you done this before?” I smiled quietly, acting cool despite the pain in my shoulder when the handle recoiled back into it that later left a terrible bruise. It was exhilarating watching the clay blast into bits in the air over Waiau River, but also disturbing that – as a pacifist who has never held a gun before – how good I actually was with a weapon. Read More

South of the Nile Delta

I think I have made a serious mistake, I thought to myself as I was crammed into a mini-van on my way through the Sinai Peninsula with two other women, both from South America. It was deep into the evening and there he stood at the van entrance, his eyes gleaming at me suspiciously as he held my passport in one hand and an AK47 in the other. My heart was racing, my mind thinking about the reality that it was just three girls surrounded by all these men. We could get dragged into the desert, raped and murdered and no one would ever know. Kidnapped, maybe sold into sexual slavery! Read More

My Documentary ‘As It Happened’

It is an amazing feeling finally completing my documentary.

There I was at Aida Refugee Camp in the West Bank, Palestine and in a situation where there was a creative opportunity to capture an important story. With my DLSR, I took it upon myself to capture this small echo so that the world can have the chance to hear it. Read More